Hol18: Venezia 3 – what to shoot?

Venice is great to visit  – but every bugger will have taken every conceivable picture there is to be taken.  That’s not to say you shouldn’t take photos, try to find something different to shoot or just decide to visit somewhere and record what’s there.  I didn’t do the usual slow shutter speed shot of blurred gondolas parked on the lagoon with San Giorgio Maggiore in the background (no tripod anyway..) but with a bog standard film camera / prime lens and cheap monochrome film you’ll get something different from the thousands of smartphone grab shots and selfies.

 

Music indifference, St Marks, Venice
Indifference to music on St Mark’s

 

Venice
St Mark’s from the Lagoon

 

 

 

Venice
A bloke fishing.  In Venice.

 

Murano
Deliveries, Murano

 

 

 

Chiesa dei Santi Geremia e Lucia
Chiesa dei Santi Geremia e Lucia..  so it is

 

Venice
Icon

 

 

 

Venice
The dynamic range of cheap 35mm film
Murano
Murano canal.

All photos shot with the Ricoh KR-5 on Oriental Seagull 100, developed in Ilfosol 3..

 

Hol18: Venezia 2. Giudecca

Giudecca is the longish island that lies opposite the main island of Venice and you can get to it by vaporetto from St Marks.   One of the main attractions is that it’s relatively quite and peaceful.  Being mainly residential, most tourists don’t go across, but it’s a delightful place with some magnificent churches, views and cafes.  En route the vaporetto also stops at San Giorgio Maggiore, the little island with the landmark church everyone photographs from across on the main island.

 

San Giorgio Maggiore
Church of San Giorgio Maggiore
San Giorgio Maggiore
Church of San Giorgio Maggiore
Church of the Santissimo Redentore, Giudecca
Church of the Santissimo Redentore, Giudecca
cool bloke, Giudecca
Giudeccan..  nice hat.
Giudecca
residential area, Giudecca
Vaporetto stops, Giudecca
Vaporetto stop, Giudecca
venice giudecca
Giudecca waterfront
Selfie.  Giudecca
along the waterfront, there is a set of mirrors.  For the Venetian selfie

Kit: Ricoh KR-5 and Oriental Seagull.

Hol18: Venezia 1. Gondolas.

This was my third visit to Venice but my first staying on the island – near the Arsenale (1-0 to the..) – as opposed to being a day tripper from elsewhere.  Venice is a crazy illogical place, has a love/hate relationship with tourists but I love it totally.

It can be an expensive place to visit.  Eating and having a coffee on St Mark’s would take up a two-day food budget for me and a Gondola ride starts at around €70.  I prefer the Vaporetto saver tickets and just photograph the Gondolas.

Grand Canal, Venice
On the Grand Canal
Gondola musician
Musical accompaniment
Venice
gondoling by the restaurant
Venice
enjoying the gondola
Venice
parked
Gondola racing. Venice
Gondola races

Photos all taken on the Ricoh KR-5 and Oriental Seagull 100.

Hol18: Status Civitatis Vaticanae

That’s Latin for Vatican City, the Catholic Church’s city state in downtown Rome.  Now I’m not one for religion of any shape nor of certain religions’ supra-earthly claim of superiority over actually-very-earthly things.  The Catholic Church in particular has been on dodgy ground over many things in the last two millennia yet it still has unfathomable status in the lives of people and nations around the world.  And at the Vatican, it has established an undeniably photogenic tourist trap.

rome vatican st peters sq3
St Peter’s Basilica

St. Peters Basilica  – and the Square  – is magnificent. From every angle.

rome vatican st peters sq2
St. Peter and the gang
rome vatican st peters sq nun
playing “Spot the Nun”

rome vatican st peters sq1

rome vatican st peters sq3 pius
Pius the Ninth.

It’s not all Catholic mysticism, history and solemnity.  Vatican as a city state has to function like cities.  There’s a post office.

rome vatican post
An Post..  as the Irish pilgrims call it
rome vatican business entrance
Goods inward – with Swiss Guard on the gate

And everything for the Tourists, of course.

rome vatican st peters sq1 fountain woman in hat
A female tourist in a wide brimmed hat is cooled by the Maderno Fountain
rome vatican tat1
Tat touristico Vaticano

Now – a bit of a personal beef.  The security at the entrance of St. Peter’s Basilica wouldn’t let me in.  Why?  I was wearing the wrong shorts.  Now they were waving by all sorts of folks in summer attire – male/female, shorts, skirts all at several levels of skimipness.  My pale, inoffensive yet atheist legs however were banned.  I tried discussing the logic of this in light of the appearance of numerous others, I channelled a bit of Wallace and Gromit referencing The Wrong Trousers but to no avail.  So I hung around for a few minutes and mingled in with a tour group to gain access.  There’s also a ban on photography which is almost univerally ignored.  Including myself with the phone.

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St Helena
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Interior
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Peter
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Those scandalous Northern Irish godless legs and footie shorts

There is of course the other side of the Catholic Church and its history that isn’t on full view.  A rather innocuous looking building is the Palace of the Holy Office.  Or.. The Inquisition.

rome vatican inquisition
nobody expects The Inquisition

And of course there is the history of the highly dodgy Popes. I’m thinking the Borgias and in particular Pope Alexander VI, a gent who made Tony Soprano look like Winnie the Pooh. But his tomb is not on view in St Peter’s with the numerous other Popes’. He can however be found about 15 minutes away, in the Spanish national church of Santa Maria in Monserrato degli Spagnoli. But I tracked him down, and there was no issue with the legs. Maybe he wasn’t that bad a Pope.

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Alexander VI – Bad Borgia Pope
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Santa Maria in Monserrato degli Spagnoli. Exterior
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Santa Maria in Monserrato degli Spagnoli. (Interior)

The Vatican and Catholic presence in Rome is great to visit and is visually and historically fascinating.  But I find the overblown sense of self-aggrandizement a bit grating given the mixed history and lust for power that the Vatican represents.

A few practicalities – don’t go early, everyone does this to beat the crowds so there are very large crowds.  Mid afternoon is a bit less frenetic.  And make sure leg-wear goes to below the knees.

Camera – Ricoh KR-5 / Oriental Seagull 100 and the Huawei P9

 

HOL18: Flavian Amphitheatre, Actually

Most of us call it The Colosseum or Coliseum, Colosseo if you’re Italian or if you really want to push the boat out – Anfiteatro Flavio.  We all know what it is when we see it – the big round ruined stadium in Rome, a classical Hampden Park but probably having seen less violence.  It’s instantly recognisable yet still a must-see when in Rome.

Colosseum 02
Flavian Amphitheatre

 

As mentioned in a previous post, there are big long queues with no shortage of touts offering beat-the-line offers at inflated prices.  Or you can book online to beat-the-line and still pay over the odds.  So worth saying again – go to the ticket office at the Forum and get a combo ticket, go to the Forum first and then walk straight by the queues into the Flavian Amp..  Colosseum.

So a hot day, A Ricoh KR-5 with a dud battery and a roll of Oriental Seagull 100 (possibly Kentere 100 or Ilford Pan 100) guessing at Sunny 16.

Colosseum 03
Exterior detail

Colosseum 08

Inside it gets no cooler, and you get an idea of the scale of the arena.

Colosseum 01
In the Arena
Colosseum 04
It wasn’t always Christian friendly…

Colosseum 06

Colosseum 05
A break from the heat

Like many places in Rome there’s free drinking water from fountains.  In a queue, an Enlgish couple were behind me discussing the visit.  She was disappointed and underwhelmed – it was, she said ‘a bit ruin-y’.  Can’t argue with that though I would add ‘magnificent’

Hol18: A funny thing happened on the way…

Rome Forum 01
Forum Romanum (Roman Forum)

Any trip to Rome should really include some Roman sites – as in ancient Rome.  There are numerous sites across the city, but as it was my first trip to Rome the easiest thing to do was the Forum and Colosseum.  Oh, and a quick travel tip – go early (obvious) and buy your combined ticket to both at the Forum entrance – everyone seems to queue at the Colosseum for a ticket, with your pre-bought ticket you can just walk smugly by.
For photography I had the sturdy Ricoh Kr-5 with a roll of Oriental Seagull 100.  After one shot, it was obvious that the Ricoh’s batteries were done – I’d no metering so it was Sunny 16.  And as it was very, very sunny, basically F16 at 1/125 or 1/250 for toning it down a bit.

The forum was at the heart of ancient rome – market places, temples, government buildings, courts – if it was happening in Rome, it happened here.  The remains date from around the 7th century BC to around the 3rd century AD.  The sense of history and place is amazing and more than I’m capable of describing, but for a tourist with a camera it’s a delight to take a slow walk around the ruins and try and capture some essence of the place.  Even on a 40 year old camera with a dodgy meter.

 

Rome Forum 08
view from the hill
Rome Forum 09
a column..
Rome Forum 11
Temple of Vesta (home of the Vestal virgins, Procul Harum fans..)

Rome Forum 02

Rome Forum 12
the obligatory peace sign pose

Rome Forum 05

Rome Forum 07
fountain

The Forum is well worth a visit, and actually makes for a much nicer photo walk than the Colosseum – which isn’t too shabby either.

HOL18: No Place Like Rome 1

When you get to a certain age, holidays should be a time for rest and relaxation. So this summer I decided to backpack from Rome to Munich over 3 weeks with an old film camera.  The robust Ricoh KR5 with a few K-mount lenses was the kit of choice with a Vivitar V3000 body as backup although this became quickly irrelevant when the back of the Vivtar fell off in transit.  

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I did have a digital option – a Fuji X20 compact and a Huawei phone – but the aim was to capture the holiday on monochrome film and with no specific photographic objective in mind other than always having the camera with me.  So first stop was a few days in Rome.  While with some cities it’s often a struggle to convey a visual identity, Rome has no such problems exuding a certain cool.  And on every street, you’ll find scooters – Vespas.

 

rome Vespa
Classical building and a Vespa
rome Vespa
Vespa.  One of many.
rome street scene 4
I love a wee European kiosk.  And a Vespa
rome casual
Woman on a scooter admiring other scooters.

It’s worth mentioning that the traffic in Rome is bloody awful and this pale middle-aged northern European would look ridiculous wobbling around the Roman vias with a well reduced life expectancy.  Unlike the natives, however who have a natural born ability to safely navigate the eternal city while remaining the smartest looking people in Europe.

Photos shot on the Ricoh KR5 on Oriental Seagull 100.