Hol18: Arrivederci Roma

Rome was everything I thought it would be – magnificent in its ruins, churches, history and people.  I’ll go again, maybe in autumn when the heat isn’t as crazy.  The sites, streets, piazzas are all undeniably photogenic and maybe in less tourist-heavy seasons, I’d take a more measured photowalk round the numerous easily walked.  Here’s some random shots of Rome.  Shots taken on the Ricoh KR5 and Lomography Earl grey 100 film.

rome along tiber 05 rome along tiber 06

rome castel san angelo 2
view of  Castel San Angelo
rome castel san angelo
Castel San Angelo
Rome Catharine Siena
Catharine of Siena
Rome fountain
a rather ornate fountain
Rome Happy Hour
Happy Hour
rome street scene 2
Street scene
rome street scene 3
Ornate Building
rome street scene
Roman Street


rome along tiber 03
Cafe along the Tiber
rome Trattoria
Trattoria
rome trevi 4
Tat at the Trevi Fountain
rome kiosk
A kiosk selling Kodak

 

Revolution! – Arbour Hill

A century on from the decade when Ireland began the final struggle to gain independance from Britsh rule, a visitor to Dublin will see memorials, museums, experiences and physical reminders of events that have shaped the Ireland of today.  Whatever your take on this chapter of British and Irish history, it’s a rewarding experience to breathe in the history and come to your own conclusions.  The  events from 1916 through to independance are marked throughout the city – the civil war not so much, but we are still a few years from this centenary.

A good starting point is the Arbour Hill cemetery.  A former British military cemetery, it’s also the burial place of 14 of the executed leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising, you can get the history on sites like Heritage Ireland.

Arbour Hill
Sacred Heart Church, Arbour Hill

While the likes of Kilmainham Gaol, the cemetery at Glasnevin and the GPO Museum are always busy with fully booked guided tours, Arbour Hill is usually deserted.  There’s no entrance fee, no guides (except an occasional free talk at the weekend) and no shop.  Once you pass the church you’re into a fairly staid and unremarkable military cemetery.  Arbour Hill

Then towards the back, there’s the reason Arbour Hill gets visitors.  The executed leaders of the Rising were unceremoniously buried at a British military cemetery seemingly to avoid the martyrdom and pilgrimages that might stoke further unrest.  History of course had other plans for Ireland, and naturally subsequent Irish governments have developed the grave as a remembrance site.

 

Arbour Hill
Grave of the 1916 executed leaders
Arbour Hill
The text of the Proclamation of Independence in English and Irish

Surrounding the grave site are stones inscribed with the names of those buried – in English and Irish script.  Thomas Clarke, the old man of the Rising, had a floral tribute marking his stone.

Arbour Hill tom clarke

Arbour Hill tom clarke irish
The names in Irish

 

One of the more fascinating characters of the Rising was James Connolly, a Scot of Irish descent, a former Britsh soldier, trade unionist and leader of the Irish Citizen Army.

Arbour Hill Connoly
Connolly marked by the Starry Plough
Arbour Hill
View from the 1916 memorial


Arbour Hill
The 1916 memorial

Arbour Hill is located a bit away from Dublin’s main tourist sites, on a quiet street at the rear of the Collins Barracks Museum.  It is however worth a visit if you’re doing some revolution tourism –  a site of great signifigance in Irish history and you’ve plenty of further options for the tourguides, multimedia displays and souvenir shops.

Photos were taken on a robust (heavy) Hanimex 35SL (a rebadged Chinon CS) a Pallas 35mm lens (never heard of them) using Lomography Earl Grey 100 film.